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Cooler Master MasterCase Maker 5T Review

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MasterCase Maker 5T System Build

Building a system into the MasterCase Maker 5T was a very fun experience. There was ample room to attach the motherboard to the motherboard tray. My big hands never felt cramped for space while building inside the MasterCase Maker 5T.

Test System

  • Motherboard:  Gigabyte GA-Z170X-Gaming 6
  • System Memory: 32GB Ballistix Elite DDR 4 2666MHz
  • Processor: Intel i7 6700k
  • CPU Cooler: Cooler Master 212 Evo w/ Noctua F12 PMW fans
  • Audio: Realtek ALC 1150
  • GPU: EVGA GTX 980Ti Classified Edition
  • System Drive: Samsung 840 EVO 120GB
  • Storage Drive: Samsung 850 EVO 500GB
  • Backup Drive: Western Digital 2TB Black
  • Optical Drive: Asus DVD Burner
  • Enclosure: Cooler Master MasterCase Maker 5T
  • PSU: Corsair HX850
  • Monitor: AOC 27″ ISP Panel
  • Operating System: Windows 10

Results

The results are glorious. The motherboard and parts fit with the red and black theme of the Maker 5t chassis. The following images just don’t do justice for this case. It’s much better looking in person. Only the Noctua fans destroy the color scheme. Once the side panel is on though, the color of the Noctua fans is muted and isn’t as noticeable.

cooler-master-mastercase-maker-5t-inside-build

As you can see, the cable management inside the case looks clean. I just wish that the PSU shroud would cover the side where all the cables in the basement of the case are.

The two grommet openings on top of the PSU shroud are placed perfectly for the GPU and front cable headers for as minimal intrusion as possible.

At the top of the case you can see plenty of clearance for your 8 pin CPU power cable and room for radiators if you so wish.

You might of noticed I removed the bottom grommet where the SATA cables plugged into the board. I had to do this because I had two 90 degree angle SATA cables, and as mentioned before, using those ends on the SSDs would of looked bad. Removing the grommet allowed me to connect them to the board without stressing the connectors and bending the grommet flap back 90 degrees. They are on the bottom slots behind the two SATA cables you can see, hiding the 90 degree cables.

And you can see the GPU stand-off reversed and helping to hold that massive 980Ti in place.

cooler-master-mastercase-maker-5t-cable-management

Cable management is fairly easy to do with the Maker 5t. I usually get annoyed with this part of a build. With a bit more effort it would be easy to clean this up since this side of the case is also visible through the glass panel. Custom power cable sleeving would be a very good route to go for even better results.

cooler-master-mastercase-maker-5t-inside-led-on

With the power turned on you can see how bright the included LED bar is. I mounted the LED bar on the top inside portion of the chassis with the LED bar facing down.

cooler-master-mastercase-maker-5t-glass

With the tempered glass side panel on this build just looks sexy as all get out! By the way, keeping that glass spotless while building was easy. I just made sure to wear cotton gloves when handling the glass. You can grab the glass by the metal framing if you are careful and avoid using gloves. Just be careful not to drop this glass, clean up would be a nightmare if it were to shatter!

cooler-master-mastercase-maker-5t-front-grille

A shot from the front while the system is running. You can see the glow of the LED bar. With a few more of them you could even out the light in the case and show off all of your build.

This is what the front IO panel looks like when powered on. The button on the left controls the three different light phases of the LED bar. You have breathing, on, and off. The button on the right controls the fans speeds, either low or high (7v or 12v). The power button glows red when powered on and doubles as an HDD activity light.

There is a Molex connector that powers the USB 3.0 LEDs, while the fan and LED buttons are powered by a SATA power cable connected to the fan/LED hub. I would of rather had the USB 3.0 LEDs powered by a SATA power cable as well, since it’s the only Molex connector in the case. I would recommend using a SATA to Molex adapter to avoid adding one more cable to the clutter just  for a single connection.


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