«

»

ASUS Z97-DELUXE Motherboard Performance Review

PAGE INDEX

<< PREVIOUS            NEXT >>

X264HD 5.0 Test

Tech ARP’s x264 HD Benchmark comprises the Avisynth video scripting engine, an x264 encoder, a sample 1080P video file, and a script file that actually runs the benchmark. The script invokes four two-pass encoding runs and reports the average frames per second encoded as a result. The script file is a simple batch file, so you could edit the encoding parameters if you were interested, although your results wouldn’t then be comparable to others.

This is another example of a useful benchmark that’s based on real-world code. I like encoding benchmarks since they’re one of the few tests that can measure a real-world use of the power of modern multi-core processors. I like this particular benchmark since it’s the best “overclock killer” I’ve seen: systems that will run most stress tests all day long with a given set of overclock settings will crash on this benchmark.

x264bench_1_2

Here we can really see the performance benefits of overclocking. Just flipping a switch on the motherboard raises the Run 1 performance by almost 8% and the Run 2 performance by almost 9%. Auto tuning gives a 9% and 10% boost, respectively, while my manual overclock hits 17% and 15% increases.

Join me in the next section for my final thoughts and conclusion.


SKIP TO PAGE:

<< PREVIOUS            NEXT >>

5 comments

Skip to comment form

  1. RealNeil

    Very expensive buying into this platform. My Z87 board is looking good enough to me at the moment. I’ll wait for something drastic by way of new technology before I buy again.

  2. David Ramsey

    As I said in my review: “If you have a Z87 or even a Z77 based motherboard, there’s little compelling reason to upgrade.”

    About the only reason I could see jumping to a Z97 system is if you had a need for the SATA Express support.

  3. SH

    I have the Z97 Pro. Do I need to turn the switches on the motherboard off in order to use the Asus AI Suite auto tune feature?

  4. David Ramsey

    No. My understanding is that the switches are read at power-on by the BIOS, but if you’ve made subsequent modifications either manually or via ASUS’ auto-tune utilities, those will take precedence.

    1. SH

      Thank you for your reply, I always got an overclocking error whenever I tried to overclock using software with the switches on, I will be trying with the switches off and find out if I have a bad board or RAM. I’ll post my results.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

CAPTCHA Image

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>