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Samsung 960 PRO NVMe SSD Review

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PCMark Vantage HDD Tests

PCMark Vantage is an objective hardware performance benchmark tool for PCs running 32- and 64-bit versions of Microsoft Windows 7. PCMark Vantage is well suited for benchmarking any type of Microsoft Windows 7 PC: from multimedia home entertainment systems and laptops, to dedicated workstations and high-end gaming rigs. Benchmark Reviews has decided to use the HDD Test Suite to demonstrate simulated real-world storage drive performance in this article.

PCMark Vantage runs eight different storage benchmarks, each with a specific purpose. Once testing is complete, results are given a PCMark score while and detailed results indicate actual transaction speeds. Since it simulates real-world consumer workloads, Vantage gives much more weight to read speeds, and fast iOPS are not as important as they would be in a server or other business environment. With an overall score of 99679 (Toshiba NVMe driver), the RD400 showed good performance, but as you can see from the chart below, the use of the Windows NVMe driver increases the overall score by over 60%.

In this benchmark, the 960 PRO returns an overall score that’s virtually identical to the 950 PRO, and substantially better than the 950 PRO RAID. Individual scores are shown below:

512GB Samsung 960 PRO PCIe SSD PCMark Vantage Results (Windows driver)

As you can see, in the PCMark Vantage benchmark, the Toshiba driver returns lower scores in every single test, and the difference is dramatic in some tests– for example, importing pictures is over three times faster using the Windows driver.

In the next section, I share my review conclusion and final product rating.


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4 comments

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  1. Costea

    Which brand of SSD do you trust most?
    Samsung. My 850 evo, is running with the speed of the ram, in rapid mode. That’s fast enaugh! 2900 mb/sec, seq.write , on a8-7600, chipset a88x, ram at 1800 mhz.

  2. EricW

    This was definitely an upgrade to the 256GB 950 Pro I had not all that much for the 950 Pro 512GB. Hopefully we eventually start to see price savings with the additional layers.

  3. D Daniels

    Confused. How is it that a 3 to 5 times “performance improvement” equates to imperceptible real world benefits. Won’t windows load faster? Won’t game zone load times be slashed?

    If not, is it xpoint we should be expecting to achieve these goals?

    1. David Ramsey

      Easy: because most of the data transfers you’ll make are quite small, in the kilobytes-to-hundreds of kilobytes range.

      Say you’ve got a 250-kilobyte block of data to read. With a SATA SSD that can do 550 megabytes per second, you can get that data in about 1/2200th of a second.

      Now with a spiffy new m.2 NVME SSD that can sustain 2.5 gigabytes per second, that data transfer take 1/10,000th of a second. Can you tell the difference, sitting in your chair?

      Of course, there will aways be use cases where the difference _is_ perceptible. But booting Windows or loading game zones isn’t just about raw data transfer rates; there’s a lot of computation going on.

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