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OCZ RD400 PCIe NVMe SSD Review

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Closer Look: OCZ RD400 m.2 SSD

Now a sub-brand of Toshiba, OCZ’s products use Toshiba controllers and NAND in their solid state storage products. The “RD” in “RD400” harkens back to the “RevoDrive” appellation OCZ used for its previous generation products, before they were acquired.

I am still not a fan of the m.2 form factor, which replaces sturdy, easy-to-handle 2.5″ metal or plastic enclosures with tiny, delicate bare circuit boards the size of a stick of gum. The RD400’s drive is a single-sided 2280 unit, which means it’s 22mm wide– as are all m.2 drives– and 80mm long. A sticker covers all the active components on the drive, and a little experimentation revealed that removing it would completely destroy it, so no chip photos this time around.

toshiba_rd400_front

The only thing on the back of the PCB is a label.

toshiba_rd400_back

The RD400 we received was mounted on a PCI-E card, which is handy if your system doesn’t have any native m.2 slots. You can buy the drive without the card for $20 less.

toshiba_rd400

If you remove the drive from the PCI-E card, you can see a thermal pad that presumably helps wick heat away from the controller. The pad is not sticky, but makes firm contact with the back of the drive when the single mounting screw is tightened.

toshiba_rd400_PCIE_card

If you buy the version of the drive with the PCI-E card, OCZ thoughtfully includes a half-height rear bracket for use in small form factor systems.

In the next section I’ll look at Toshiba’s SSD Utility software.


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2 comments

  1. AMT

    Could we get a test comparison to load certain games, like load times comparisons to sata ssd?
    example, Star Citizen can have some pretty long load times with SATA SSD, would be nice to know if these drives help out much in these situations etc.

    1. Olin Coles

      While the storage device certainly has a lot to do with load time, the speed and architecture of RAM and CPU are also heavily involved. It would be disingenuous to compare one to another unless the user has the exact same system that we use for testing, which is very unlikely.

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