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Samsung 950 PRO SSD RAID-0 Performance

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Iometer IOPS Performance

Iometer is an I/O subsystem measurement and characterization tool for single and clustered systems. Iometer does for a computer’s I/O subsystem what a dynamometer does for an engine: it measures performance under a controlled load. Iometer was originally developed by the Intel Corporation and formerly known as “Galileo”. Intel has discontinued work on Iometer, and has gifted it to the Open Source Development Lab (OSDL). There is currently a new version of Iometer in beta form, which adds several new test dimensions for SSDs.

Iometer is both a workload generator (that is, it performs I/O operations in order to stress the system) and a measurement tool (that is, it examines and records the performance of its I/O operations and their impact on the system). It can be configured to emulate the disk or network I/O load of any program or benchmark, or can be used to generate entirely synthetic I/O loads. It can generate and measure loads on single or multiple (networked) systems.

To measure random I/O response time as well as total I/O’s per second, Iometer is set to use 4KB file size chunks over a 100% random sequential distribution at a queue depth of 32 outstanding I/O’s per target. The tests are given a 50% read and 50% write distribution. While this pattern may not match traditional ‘server’ or ‘workstation’ profiles, it illustrates a single point of reference relative to our product field.

All of our SSD tests used Iometer 1.1.0 (build 08-Nov-2010) by Intel Corporation to measure IOPS performance. Iometer is configured to use 32 outstanding I/O’s per target and random 50/50 read/write distributionconfiguration: 4KB 100 Random 50-50 Read and Write.icf. The chart below illustrates combined random read and write IOPS over a 120-second Iometer test phase, where highest I/O total is preferred:

Iometer_Random_4K-IOPS_30QD_Results

After testing some TLC NAND-based SSDs with relatively weak IOPS performance, it’s amazing to see the Samsing 950 PRO array chew through over 214,000 IOPS per second. To be fair, though, this is pretty much the same performance we got from a single 950 PRO. Remember that RAID systems can’t help IOPS performance.

In our next section, we test linear read and write bandwidth performance and compare the speed of the Samsung SSD array against several other top storage products using the AIDA64 Disk Benchmark.


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7 comments

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  1. Eric

    Question: Is RAID-0 SSDs worth it?
    Answer: Nope!

    1. David Ramsey

      Not for most people. Still, there are situations where yes, you could indeed use that kind of speed.

  2. David Musoke

    I have this drive configured as a 512GB x2 RAID-0 array.

    1. How can I update its driver from Samsung as it keeps on saying:

    “Samsung NVM Express Drive is not connected. Please connect the device and retry”.

    In fact no software from Samsung recognize my SSD RAID-0 array. What am I supposed to do to fix this? Samsung has not responded to my query…

    2. Can I convert from my RAID-0 array to a single 1TB drive without losing data? If so, how can I do it?
    The speed data you’ve taken there isn’t much difference in performance…

    Thanks,
    David

    1. David Ramsey

      1. Sorry, I don’t know of any way to get the Samsung software to recognize the RAID.

      2. No, there’s no way to convert your RAID 0 array “in place” to a non-RAID 1TB drive. You’ll have to back the drive’s contents up, break the array, created the spanned drive (if your motherboard BIOS supports that) and restore it.

      But why bother? The only thing you’d accomplish is making your 1TB volume somewhat slower. I’m pretty sure if the Samsung software won’t recognize a RAID 0 volume, it won’t recognize a spanned volume either.

  3. Oscar Alejandro Guignant

    Hi, the results obtained with CrystalDiskMark (3286MB/s reads and 2680MB/s writes) are on a software or hardware raid?
    I create a Raid 0 with Intel Raid Controller and not get to those numbers with CrystalDiskMark.

    1. David Ramsey

      Oscar, I created the RAID with the built-in software– i.e. Intel– on the MSI motherboard, which is equipped with two m.2 slots.

  4. Keith

    I recommend using an Asrock Extreme 7+ motherboard with Windows 10 on a flash drive and the latest Intel Rapid Storage Technology drivers on another flash drive. This motherboard will allow you to create a RAID0 array on say thee Samsung 512GB m.2 drives. There are guides on the internet on how to setup the BIOS and go through the required steps.

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